Evaluation of Plant Growth, Yield and Yield Attributes of Biofield Energy Treated Mustard (Brassica juncea) and Chick Pea (Cicer arietinum) Seeds

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Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
2015; 4(6): 291-295
Published online December 22, 2015 (http://www.sciencepublishinggroup.com/j/aff)
doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20150406.19
ISSN:2328-563X (Print); ISSN:2328-5648 (Online)
Evaluation of Plant Growth, Yield and Yield Attributes of
Biofield Energy Treated Mustard (Brassica juncea) and
Chick Pea (Cicer arietinum) Seeds
Mahendra Kumar Trivedi
1
, Alice Branton
1
, Dahryn Trivedi
1
, Gopal Nayak
1
,
Sambhu Charan Mondal
2
, Snehasis Jana
2, *
1
Trivedi Global Inc., Henderson, USA
2
Trivedi Science Research Laboratory Pvt. Ltd.,
Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
Email address:
publication@trivedisrl.com (S. Jana)
To cite this article:
Mahendra Kumar Trivedi, Alice Branton, Dahryn Trivedi, Gopal Nayak, Sambhu Charan Mondal, Snehasis Jana. Evaluation of Plant
Growth, Yield and Yield Attributes of Biofield Energy Treated Mustard (Brassica Juncea) and Chick Pea (Cicer Arietinum) Seeds.
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 4, No. 6, 2015, pp. 291-295. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20150406.19
Abstract:
The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment on mustard
(Brassica juncea) and chick pea (Cicer arietinum) for their growth, yield, and yield attributes. Both the samples were divided
into two groups. One group was remained as untreated and coded as control, while the other group (both seed and plot) was
subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment and referred as the treated. The result showed the plant height of mustard
and chick pea was increased by 13.2 and 97.41%, respectively in the treated samples as compared to the control. Additionally,
primary branching of mustard and chick pea was improved by 7.4 and 19.84%, respectively in the treated sample as compared
to the control. The control mustard and chick pea crops showed high rate of infection by pests and diseases, while treated crops
were free from any infection of pests and disease. The yield attributing characters of mustard showed, lucidly higher numbers
of siliquae on main shoot, siliquae/plant and siliquae length were observed in the treated seeds and plot as compared with the
control. Moreover, similar results were observed in the yield attributing parameters of chick pea viz. pods/plant, grains/pod as
well as test weight of 1000 grains. The seed and stover yield of mustard in treated plots were increased by 61.5% and 25.4%,
respectively with respect to the control. However, grain/seed yield of mustard crop after biofield energy treatment was
increased by 500% in terms of kg per meter square as compared to the control. Besides, grain/seed yield of chick pea crop after
biofield energy treatment was increased by 500% in terms of kg per meter square. The harvest index of biofield treated
mustard was increased by 21.83%, while it was slight increased in case of chick pea. In conclusion, the biofield energy
treatment could be used on both the seeds and plots of mustard and chick pea as an alternative way to increase the production
and yield.
Keywords:
Mustard, Chick Pea, Biofield Energy Treatment, Growth, Yield, Yield Attribute
1. Introduction
Grain legumes being the major protein source in human
and animal nutrition, play a major key role in crop rotations
across the world. Among the various oilseed crops, mustard
is one of the important because of its potential utilities in
the growing biofuels industries [1]. It is widely used as a
condiment and as edible oil. The pungency of mustard oil is
due to the presence of allyl-isothiocyanate. The low
pungency of mustard oil can be obtained after inactivating
the myrosinase enzyme present in it and used as a filler
component in various processed meat products [2].
Glucosinolates are the major class of bioactive
phytocontituents mainly rich in mustard [3]. Mustard seed
extract has the potential chemo-preventive and
chemotherapeutic activities in vitro by scavenging the
hydroxyl radicals; it also induces apoptosis of cancer cells
[4]. It is also reported that the antioxidant activities of
mustard seeds extract [1, 5]. Crop rotation along with other
crops also improve the soil fertility, and reduces weeds,
pest, and diseases [6]. Chick pea (Cicer arietinum) is the
major legume in the vegetarian diet with high carbohydrate
content. It is one of the drought resistant crops, and
292 Mahendra Kumar Trivedi et al.: Evaluation of Plant Growth, Yield and Yield Attributes of Biofield Energy
Treated Mustard (Brassica Juncea) and Chick Pea (Cicer Arietinum) Seeds
considered as an important legume in the newly cultivated
land. Chick pea is the third most widely grown grain
legume after bean and soybean in the world. Due to its very
high protein concentration (approximate 19.3-25.4%), its
agronomical importance is demanding for human and
animal diet as an alternative protein source. Utilization of
nitrogen was reported with enhanced yield, and yield
attributes in legume [7]. The National Center for
Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), allows the
use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)
therapies such as biofield energy as an alternative in the
healthcare field. About 36% of US citizens regularly use
some form of CAM [8], in their daily activities. CAM
embraces numerous energy-healing therapies; biofield
therapy is one of the energy medicine used worldwide to
improve the overall human health. Mr. Trivedi’s unique
biofield treatment (The Trivedi effect
®
) has been extensively
contributed in scientific communities in the field of
agricultural science [9-12] and chemical science [13].
Due to the necessity of mustard and chick pea as the food
resource, and the improvement in overall productivity of
these two plants, an effective control measure need to be
established. Under these circumstances, the present work was
undertaken to evaluate the effect of biofield energy treatment
on mustard and chick pea in relation to growth, yield, and
yield attributes.
2. Materials and Methods
The seeds and plots of both mustard and chick pea were
selected for the study. Field experiments on mustard and
chick pea were conducted at the Agricultural Research Farm
of the Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu
University, Varanasi, India during winter season. The
experiments on both mustard and chick pea were performed
un-replicated with gross plot size of 12.0 m x 6.0 m. One
portion of both mustard and chick pea (seeds and plots) was
considered as control; no biofield energy treatment was
given. Besides, equally divided other portion (seeds and
plots) was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy
treatment. Mustard crop was sprayed with insecticide
(0.125% Rogor) against the aphid, while no plant protection
was given to chick pea. Mustard and chick pea were received
two and one irrigation, respectively.
2.1. Biofield Energy Treatment Strategy
The above assigned both seeds and plots of both mustard
and chick pea were subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy
treatment under ambient conditions. Mr. Trivedi provided the
treatment to the seeds through his inherent unique energy
transmission process without touching the seeds or lands.
Afterward, both the control and the treated samples were
assessed for growth, yield, and yield attributes of both
mustard and chick pea plant.
2.2. Growth, Yield, and Yield Attributes of Mustard
Biofield treated mustard seeds were allowed to germinate
until ready to be transplanted according to the season. As a
control, untreated mustard seeds were allowed to germinate
in the same manner and transplanted alongside the treated
plots in a randomized fashion. Overall, the plant height,
primary and secondary branches, seed/grain yield, and
harvest index of the control and treated mustard crops were
calculated [14].
2.3. Growth, Yield, and Yield Attributes of Chick Pea
Both the control and biofield treated chick pea seeds were
permitted to germinate until they ready to be transplanted to
the particular season. After germination both plantlets were
transplanted in the pre-defined plots separated with an
imaginary barrier. The plant height, primary and secondary
branches, seed/grain yield, and harvest index of the both
control and treated chick pea crops were noted [14].
3. Results and Discussion
3.1. Growth, Yield, and Yield Attributes of Mustard
Allelopathy is the process of plant communication system
through the direct or indirect, detrimental or advantageous
effects of one plant to another. They communicate through
the release of allelochemicals i.e. the secondary metabolites
or waste products of plants into the environment through
leaching, root exudation, volatilization and decomposition of
plant residues. The mustard plant belongs to Brassicaceae
family cited as allelopathic crop [15]. The growth, yield, and
yield attributes of mustard seedling data of control and
treated samples are shown in Table 1.
Table 1. Growth, yield attributes and yield of control and biofield treated mustard.
Group
Plant
height
(cm)
Branches/plant Siliquae/plant
Siliquae
length
(cm)
1000 seed
wt. (g)
Seeds yield Stover yield Harvest index (%)
Primary
Secondary
Main
shoot
Total
kg/plot
*
q/ha kg/plot
q/ha
Control
141.4 5.4 11.5 25.5 176.2
4.96 5.34 3.66 7.56 14.15 30.64
19.79
Treated
160.0 5.9 11.7 36.0 191.4
5.47 5.41 5.91 12.21
18.60 38.42
24.11
*
Net plot size 11×4.4 = 48.4 m
2
.
The effect of biofield energy treatment and its related data
are presented in Table 1, which revealed marked difference in
plant height of treated mustard at maturity as compared with
the control. Plants obtained from the biofield treated seeds
and plot grew taller and were recorded 13.2% higher plant
height than the control plants. Primary branching in treated
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 2015; 4(6): 291-295 293
plots were improved by 7.4%, while slight increase was
reported in secondary branches as compared with the control.
Among the yield attributing characters, lucidly higher
number of siliquae on main shoot, siliquae/plant and siliquae
length were observed in treated seeds and plot as compared
with the control. The seed and stover yield of mustard in
treated plots were increased by 61.5% and 25.4%,
respectively with respect to the control. However, grain/seed
yield of mustard crop after biofield treatment was increased
by 500% in terms of kg per meter square (Fig. 1). The
harvest index of treated mustard was increased by 21.83% as
compared to the control.
Use of fertilizers, pesticides, and nutrient management has
been well reported as they play a key role in increasing and
stabilizing the productivity of mustard [16]. The study results
concluded, that the biofield energy treatment could be a new
and safe approach in term of growth and yield of mustard
crop.
Figure 1. Effect of biofield energy treatment on percent increase in
grain/seed yield of mustard and chick pea crops.
3.2. Effect on Growth, Yield, and Yield Attributes of Chick
Pea
The results related with growth and yield attributes of
chick pea before and after the biofield energy treatment are
presented in Table 2.
Table 2. Growth, yield attributes and yield of control and biofield treated chick pea.
Group
Plant
height (cm)
Branches
/plant
Pods/
plant
Grains/
pod
1000 seed
wt (g)
Grain yield Straw yield
Harvest
index (%)
kg/plot
*
q/ha kg/plot q/ha
Control 30.9 12.6 21.8 1.38 162.8 1.92 4.15 3.53 7.64 35.20
Treated 61.0 15.1 38.4 1.56 195.9 8.91 19.30 16.0 34.63 35.78
*
Net plot size 11×4.2 = 46.2 m
2
.
The results showed marked difference in growth characters
of biofield treated chick pea as compared with the control.
The linear growth as well as total number of branch/plant
were recorded at harvest, and were found considerably higher
in treated seeds and plot as compared with the control. The
plants obtained from the treated seeds and plot were increase
by 97.41% as compared the control plant. Branches per
plants were also improved in biofield treated group by
19.84% as compared with the control. Similar results were
noticed in yield attributing parameters viz. pods/plant,
grains/pod as well as test weight of 1000 grains.
Considerable infestation of wilt leading was observed which
leads to plant mortality in untreated plots sown with normal
seeds. Due to the better plant stand as well as growth and
yield attributing characters, grain and straw yields of biofield
energy treated plots increased by 365.1% and 353.3%,
respectively. To improve the overall yield of chick pea,
salinity mediated productivity have been reported with better
growth [17]. The experimental results suggested biofield
treated chick pea showed better yield as compared with the
control. Moreover, grain/seed yield of chick pea crop after
biofield energy treatment was also increased by 500% in
terms of kg per meter square (Fig. 1). The harvest index was
slightly increased in the case of treated chick pea as
compared to the control.
The biofield treated crops had dark green colored leaves
with a thick consistency being more in numbers, as compared
with the control crops. The control mustard crop showed high
rate of infection by pests and diseases, and leaves were
reported with survival rate hardly by 40%, while biofield
treated mustard was free from any kind of diseases or pests
attack, and leaves were quite thick, large, dark green in color,
and more secondary and tertiary branches. Similarly, biofield
treated chick pea showed high survival rate after
germination, free from any kind of infections, the canopy of
plant was better as compared with the control. Overall, the
treated crops showed high yield as compared with the
control. However, crops from all the treated seeds were found
with a very thick population and free from the diseases and
pests attack as compared with the respective control. In
biofield treated seeds, there was no airborne infection
observed which defies the laws of aerobiology.
The canopy of the biofield energy treated trees was more than
the double as compared to the control; and had more secondary
and tertiary branches. Leaf area was significantly more in the
treated crop, which was well indicated with more grain/seed
yields. Leaf area is directly related with the final productivity of
the crop [18]. The longevity of the all crops in the treated plot
was found to be increased, hence fruiting period has also been
extended resulting in higher yield. Weed or unwanted plant
growth was not seen in the treated plot, whereas in the control
plot even after spraying weedicides (three-time) the weeds were
continuously required to be removed approximately four times
manually. It was reported that climatic change can influence the
flowering time, and overall productivity of crops [19], biofield
treated crops resulted in better flowering, which was directly
related to overall productivity.
However, biofield treatment has been reported an
improved overall plant health of Withania somnifera and
Amaranthus dubius. Leaf, stem, flower, seed setting, and
immunity parameters were reported with enhanced effect
after biofield treatment. Concentrations of chlorophyll a,
294 Mahendra Kumar Trivedi et al.: Evaluation of Plant Growth, Yield and Yield Attributes of Biofield Energy
Treated Mustard (Brassica Juncea) and Chick Pea (Cicer Arietinum) Seeds
chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll were consistently higher
in treated plants along with genetic variability using RAPD
DNA fingerprinting [12]. The impact of biofield treatment on
the yield of ginseng, blueberry [10], and growth and yield of
lettuce and tomato were reported [9]. Similar results were
observed in our experiment with biofield treated mustard and
chick pea. The results are well supported with the reported
literature in terms of growth and yield of crops. Based on
these results, it is expected that biofield energy treatment has
the scope to be an alternative approach to improve the plant
growth, yield, yield attributes, and development of crops.
4. Conclusions
Based on the study outcome, the biofield energy treated
mustard and chick pea
showed significant improvement of
overall yield of the treated crops as compared to the control.
The seed and stover yield of mustard in treated plots were
increased by 61.5% and 25.4%, respectively as compared to
the control. The percentage increase in yield was maximum
in case of mustard (500%) in the biofield treated seed as
compared to the control. Linear growth, plant height,
branches, and grain/seed yield of mustard and chick pea were
consistently increased in all the biofield treated crops,
without any precautionary measures such as pesticides,
fungicides, and organic additives. The harvest index of
treated mustard was increased by 21.83%, whereas the
harvest index was slightly increased in the treated chick pea
as compared to the control. The chick pea plants obtained
from the treated seeds and plot were increase by 97.41% as
compared the control plant. Additionally, the growth and
yield attributing characters, grain and straw yields of biofield
energy treated chick pea were increased by 365.1% and
353.3%, respectively as compared to the control. Overall, Mr.
Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment resulted in improved yield
in multiple kinds of crop, suggested the significant
application of biofield treatment in agriculture sector instead
of chemical measures to improve the overall productivity. In
conclusion, the present investigation demonstrates that Mr.
Trivedi’s unique biofield treatment could be utilized as an
alternate therapeutic approach concurrent with other existing
approach to improve the productivity of mustard and chick
pea in the field of agriculture in the near future.
Abbreviations
NCCIH: National Center for Complementary and
Integrative Health; CAM: Complementary and Alternative
Medicine.
Acknowledgements
Financial assistance from Trivedi science, Trivedi
testimonials and Trivedi master wellness is gratefully
acknowledged. Authors thank Agricultural Research Farm of
the Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu
University, Varanasi, India for their support.
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